Quilts From/Cobijas del St. David, Arizona

The late Mrs. Lula Edge of St. David, Arizona, with a quilt she and her granddaughter had made the previous summer. April, 1980  [image courtesy of James S. Griffith]
The late Mrs. Lula Edge of St. David, Arizona, with a quilt she and her
granddaughter had made the previous summer. April, 1980 
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

The purpose of this quilt was to teach the teenaged granddaughter how to piece and quilt. This quilt, therefore, constitutes physical evidence of the transmission of a valued family tradition. Quilts may have overall or repeated patterns; this one is of an overall, "Lone Star" pattern.

A "Log Cabin" pattern quilt made by Mrs. Lilly Lindly of St. David, Arizona, April, 1980 [image courtesy of James S. Griffith]
A "Log Cabin" pattern quilt made by Mrs. Lilly Lindly of
St. David, Arizona, April, 1980
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

This is a good example of a quilt with repeated pattern. Each square adhered to the same general pattern of concentric strips. As is often the case in Anglo-American quilting, the colors are light but muted. In this case, the pattern has been made more complex by arranging the squares in such a way that an overall pattern of light and dark diagonals is formed. Some quilters call this the "Straight Furrow" variation of the "Log Cabin" pattern.

The very names of many of the patterns, harking back to an idealized rural America, inject a set of nostalgic values into much Anglo-American quilting.

This was made by members of Mrs. Lindly's quilting circle in Bisbee, Arizona, on the occasion of her departure for St. David. Each woman cut and stitched a square, and embroidered her name in it. Aside from the names, the squares are identical. The double-lozenge quilting pattern has a name as well; it is the "Jerusalem Chain." Friendship quilts are common in many communities, and allow the quilt to provide sentimental as well as physical warmth.

Detail of a "Friendship Quilt" in the possession of Mrs. Lindly of St. David, Arizona, April, 1980 [image courtesy of James S. Griffith]
Detail of a "Friendship Quilt" in the possession of
Mrs. Lindly of St. David, Arizona, April, 1980
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

La difunta Sra. Lula Edge de St. David, Arizona, con una cobija que habían hecho 
ella y su nieta el verano anterior, abril de 1980 
[la imagen por cortesía de James S. Griffith]
La difunta Sra. Lula Edge de St. David, Arizona, con una cobija que habían hecho ella y su nieta el verano anterior, abril de 1980 [la imagen por cortesía de James S. Griffith]

El propósito de esta cobija fue enseñarle a su nieta adolescente a coser una cobija. Por lo tanto, esta cobija constituye evidencia física de la transmisión de una tradición familiar valorada. Las cobijas pueden tener diseños en su totalidad repetidos; este es un diseño total de “Estrella Solitaria.”

Cobija con un diseño de cabaña de leña hecha por la Sra. Lily Lindly 
de St. David, Arizona, abril de 1980
[la imagen por cortesía de James S. Griffith]
Cobija con un diseño de cabaña de leña hecha por la Sra. Lily Lindly de St. David, Arizona, abril de 1980 [la imagen por cortesía de James S. Griffith]

Esta cobija es un buen ejemplo de un diseño repetido. Cada cuadro se adhiere al mismo diseño de tiras concéntricas. A menudo es el caso que en las cobijas anglo-americanas, los colores son claros pero también tenues. En este caso, se ha hecho el diseño más complejo para colocar los cuadros en tal manera que se forme un diseño total de diagonales claras y oscuras. Algunos creadores de cobijas le nombran a esta variación de “Zanja Derecha” del diseño de “Cabaña de Leña.”

Los nombres mismos de muchos diseños, que se remontan a una América rural idealizada, inyectan un grupo de valores nostálgicos en muchas cobijas anglo-americanas.

Esta cobija fue hecha por miembros de un círculo de creadores de cobijas de la Sra. Lindly en Bisbee, Arizona, con motivo de su partida para St. David. Cada mujer cortó y cosió un cuadro, y bordó su nombre en él. Aparte de los nombres, los cuadros son iguales. El diseño de rombos dobles en la cobija tiene un nombre también; es la "Cadena de Jerusalén.” Las cobijas de amistad son comunes en muchas comunidades, y permiten que la cobija proporcione una calidez, tanto sentimental como física.

Detail of a "Friendship Quilt" in the possession of Mrs. Lindly of St. David, Arizona, April, 1980 [image courtesy of James S. Griffith]
Detail of a "Friendship Quilt" in the possession of
Mrs. Lindly of St. David, Arizona, April, 1980
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]