Oral Histories, Remembrances & Interviews

Just Memories

In Just Memories, Roy P. Drachman shared his memories from a lifetime in Tucson.

The original volume was printed and distributed in July, 1979. The electronic version was orginally created in December 1997 and the re-designed interface published to the Web in November 2004. Just Memories contributes to preserving Tucson's twentieth century history as experienced by the grandson of a pioneer family. Click on any of the chapter titles that appear at the top of each page to navigate through this electronic text.

Trek of Seven Sisters

Among the pioneers that came to Tucson in the 1870's were seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. They opened a school next to San Agustín Church for the children of Tucson and three years later one for the native American children at the San Xavier Mission. Later the parochial school was put under the direction of the Sisters and an orphanage was begun. In 1880, they took in the first patients at St. Mary's Hospital caring for the sick and injured of the Southern Pacific Railroad, County patients, and all who came.

War Relocation Authority

On March 18, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order No. 9102, "Establishing the War Relocation Authority in the Executive Office of the President and Defining its Functions and Duties." This order created a civilian agency in the Office for Emergency Management to provide for the removal of persons or classes of people from designated areas as previously denoted under Executive Order No. 9066.

In the Steps of Esteban

Founded by homesteaders, cowboys, and soldiers, Tucson's African American community has a long and proud history that has contributed much to Tucson's rich heritage. These pioneers built neighborhoods, established churches and businesses, and fought to end discrimination and prejudice. Their descendants are leaders today in business, education, government and the arts.